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On Sun, 11 Feb 2001, Frank Mittelbach wrote:

> how much evidence do you really have with respect to this? this is a serious
> question. unfortunately the majority of the owners of super fast PCs and
> unlimited memory have no use for even simple accents that would fit
> comfortably into a single 8bit encoding, eg T1, and a lot of those who could
> make good use of Omega currently are working with the machines of the
> seventies or not far further.

And so because there people who can't afford to buy a decent PC we should
stick to plain old TeX? I am using Solaris 8 on an Intel machine
and I have no problem to write whatever I like. The same applies to
all happy Linux users. (W2K fully supports Unicode...) Moreover, I
think that Omega addresses another importand issue: the preparation of
a multilingual document. Typing >'a (accented alpha with breathing) is not
an acceptable solution for a person who wants to type Greek text. People
want to be able to see at least what they type and with plain old TeX one
cannot type polytonic and English text! (Actually you can but you have to
switch font encodings, use "funny" symbol combination like the '>a, etc.,
which is something unnatural compared to what people can do with say
Unicode M$Word.) Omega clearly solves this problem the "expected" way.
And yes there more "exotic" cases where TeX can't be of any help at all.
A.S.

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*Apostolos Syropoulos                                          *
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